VISA Information

Foreign nationals visiting Thailand must possess valid passports or accepted travel documents and appropriate visas before entering the country. Please click here, for more information.

Emergency and Important
Telephone numbers

Emergency Services

Emergency Services
Emergency Services
191
Fire
Fire
199
Ambulance
Ambulance
1646
Tourist Police
Tourist Police
1155
Emergency Medical Service
Emergency Medical Service
1669
Thailand Tourism
Thailand Tourism
1672

Hospitals

Bangkok Christian
02 235 1000-7
Bangkok International
02 310 3000
BNH Hospital
02 686 2700
Bumrungrad International
02 667 1000
Camillian
02 391 0136
Deja
02 246 0137
Lerdsin
02 353 9798-9
Paolo Memorial
02 279 7000
Petcharavej
02 318 0080-1
Phaya Thai 2
02 617 2444
Piyavate
02 625 6500
Police General
02 252 8111
Praram 9
02 202 9999
Prommitr
02 259 0373
Rutnin Eye
02 639 3399
Saint Louis
02 210 9999
Samitivej Sukhumvit
02 711 8000
Sukhumvit Hospital
02 391 0011

Do’s & Don’ts

The Thai people are known for their warmth and hospitality, and this has become Thailand’s cultural icon. However, Thai culture is very different from the West and with any inter-cultural relationships, there is a need for common mutual respect, courtesy, and good manners. Therefore, there are some distinct aspects that are worthy of special mention.

Respect for the Monarchy

Woven deeply into Thailand’s culture is high reverence and respect for Their Majesties the King and Queen of Thailand and the Royal Family. One important example is to stand at attention whenever the national or royal anthem is played at any public gathering including in a cinema.


Religion

The main religion of the Thai people is Buddhism. However, there are also other faiths accepted and practiced in Thailand. Therefore, tourists should have respect for places and objects of worship of the various religions, and observe peace and order during religious assemblies or ceremonies. Also dress neatly - shorts, mini-skirts and sleeveless T-shirts, and tops, and sundresses are not considered appropriate. While it is alright to wear shoes and sandals around the compound of a temple, these must be removed when entering the sanctuary or chapel. Also all Buddha images are considered as sacred; hence, show respect and reverence in public places where these images are present and especially when taking photographs of them.

Etiquette

Traditionally, Thai people do not shake hands. They greet each other by putting their palms together in a prayer-like gesture called a ‘wai’. A younger person would ‘wai’ an older person first and the latter will respond. It is also good to bear in mind that the ‘wai’ symbolizes the paying of respect, and it follows that where one is meeting more senior people, regardless of their age, one would start the ‘wai’ first. It is also perfectly acceptable to address your Thai host, guest or associate by his/her first name instead of his/her family name. The salutation in a Thai greeting is Khun and is not gender specific. Some traditional Thai meals are served with guests sitting on the floor. While sitting on the floor, do not point your foot toward another person but keep your feet nicely tucked away as you sit. In the Thai culture, the foot represents the lowest part of the human anatomy and using it to point to someone is interpreted as a rude gesture. Whilst the foot is considered the lowest part of the human anatomy in Thai culture, the head is considered the most revered. Thus, it is considered impolite to touch someone’s head, even if the gesture is considered friendly in some cultures. Further to this, when in a group, young people will make an effort to lower their heads when passing by the more elderly ones. This is to avoid the implications that the younger ones are ‘looking down’ on the more elderly ones. It may be an effort, but it is the attitude that counts.

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